The Storm Before The Storm by Mike Duncan

34184069Mike Duncan is known, among people who follow such a thing, as a history podcaster.  He paved the way for the now ubiquitous “History of …” style with his History of Rome, before moving onto covering Revolutions (so far: the English Civil War, the American, a variety of French, Haiti and South American independence). He has a dry wit and interests in politics that allow him to take the most detailed of topics, and explain them through modern analogies, jokes and good old fashioned story telling.  The Storm Before The Storm is his first outing as an author.

In it he returns to ground he covered back in the History of Rome – the downfall of the Roman Republic. But unlike other books he steers clear of Pompey, Julius Caesar or Octavian. For Duncan, it’s the earlier stages that bear more attention.  TSBTS deals with the Italian struggle for citizenship, the reformist Gracchi brothers, and ultimately the struggle for supremacy between Marius and Sulla.

This isn’t obscure by any means, but in most tellings it is left as an introduction or a few short chapters before the main story arc begins. (One of my favourite books is Rubicon by Tom Holland.  In that he get through the same period in the first 20% of the book)  But Duncan explains how the damage to the political structure was dealt in this period, with increasing deviation from the traditions and conventions (mos maiorum) that held the Republic together.  By the time Sulla is putting up proscription lists of enemies for execution, the whole thing is doomed.

Duncan’s story telling is as good as ever and re-centring the story around convention and the Italians does add something, even for readers already familiar with the story.  Even so, there is a part in between the Gracchi and the Social War where the names keep coming and going too quick to follow and the book (briefly) becomes a little dry.  The fast pace stops this becoming an issue however.  I’d definitely recommend it.  Maybe not over Rubicon as a first introduction, but it’s in the same league.  It’s less personality focus, but it may give a better picture of how the system of the Republic collapsed.

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