Post 63: History of Rome/Revolutions Fundraiser

With the ease that the internet allows, many people who run blogs or podcasts (even very good ones) will be amateurs making the most of their spare time. However, time can be limited and running things can cost money – so podcasts will sometimes consider ways to raise funds. Some of these methods work better than others, but there’s plenty of room for inventiveness.

Some like the History of Byzantium podcast may sell occasional special episodes. Others like Hardcore History may sell large parts of their back catalogue (at a fairly decent price too, given the length – they’re worth checking out). Many like David Crowther’s History of England podcast, may just have an option for donations. Peter Adamson at the History of Philosophy gets a grant. And some like The History of Iran podcast are even funded via Kickstarter.

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Post 20: History of Byzantium Podcast

The History of Byzantium podcast by Robin Pierson is another series in the “History of X” mould that follows the style of Mike Duncan’s History of Rome. Even more than that, it is intended as an unofficial follow up to that series which ended at the fall of the Western Roman Empire. It therefore aims to tell the story of the Eastern Roman Empire from where that left off in 476 A.D to the fall of Constantinople in 1453 A.D (though it is currently paused at 620, so there’s still quite some way to go). A continuation to cover this was much requested from Mike Duncan towards the end of his series, not just for the sake of some more episodes but also because Byzantine history can be pretty awesome in its own right, so it was great to see someone step up to fill in that gap. It’s not an easy task either, the culture, politics, religion and challenges of the Empire are obviously different to those of the old unified Roman empire and will change considerably over the next thousand years. Juggling these different aspects and painting a detailed picture of the world they combine in is essential.

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Post 13: The Ancient World Podcast

Created by Scott Chesworth and hosted at http://ancientworldpodcast.blogspot.co.uk/ and intended as a broad introduction to ancient history, cultures, technologies and achievements – this podcast, beginning in April 2012 and originally running to October 2013*, gave a brief trip through world history from the Elamites and Summerians settling down in 4000 B.C to the Roman Republic around 500 B.C.

And this does mean world history – understandably** most of the focus is on the Middle East and Egypt, but we do get some welcome diversions around the world to the Norte Chico people of Peru, the Shang dynasty in China and even ancient Britain. Along with this broad geographical scope, it also steers clear from being a purely military or political history, and the growth of agriculture (for example) and its role in these civilizations is covered particularly well. These give it a well rounded take on ancient history, which can sometimes have a tendency to focus solely on the military campaigns of the comparatively well documented Mediterranean and Middle East.

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History podcasts

I decided to start this blog because I wanted to have a bit of a play around with html and a few other things like that – so apologies if I start abusing marquee text at some stage. Now I need to actually find some content to fill it!

I was thinking through my previous experiences with wordpress – mostly via history podcasts. I therefore came up with the idea of listing a few of these history podcasts I’ve enjoyed over the last few years. On closer inspection, I had wordpress and typepad mixed up but it provided me with that little bit of inspiration for my first post. Apologies for the quality of the writing – I’m doing this for my own amusement as much as anything else, I don’t expect anyone to actually read this.

History Podcasts

I’ll begin by briefly covering two of the classics in the field, Hardcore History by Dan Carlin and History of Rome by Mike Duncan. I’m not going to go into much detail as these are relatively well known.

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